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The 100




Agent for H.A.R.M.
(1966)
Reviewed by Scott Murdock
Rating: 7.5 Beans

he worst side-effect of the popularity of the James Bond series of movies has been the onslaught of rip-offs, the worst of which coming out during the mid-to-late sixties. Of these, "Agent for H.A.R.M." is one of the worst.

H.A.R.M. agent Adam Chance (Mark Richman, an actor whose career consitis mainly of TV guest appearances) is given the assignment of protecting a scientist defecting from some communist country, Dr. Janos Steffanic (World War II movie veteran Carl Esmond in his last film role). Dr. Steffanic has developed a deadly biological weapon -- a handheld gun that shoots fungus spores at its target. The victim is instantly consumed by fungus when hit. A series of nonsuspensful and uninteresting plots twists, fights, and chases leads agent Chance (who looks like a dull version of Mr. Rogers) to a house in Mexico where those commie bastards are trying to steal the spore gun. There's a very forced attempt at a love affair between Chance and Dr. Steffanic's bikini-wearning niece, but it takes the secret agent about an hour longer than it takes us to realize that she is a commie, too. Oh well, this is the 1960s, so there is never a fear that Hollywood might let the commies win.

More than anything, this movie is boring. Give it a watch if you are interested in seeing a badly-made spy movie, but if you are looking for cheesy camp value, I can only say that you might find just a little here.






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