In Association with Amazon.com



A B C D E F G
H I J K L M N
O P Q R S T U
V W X Y Z *
WE ARE NOW SEEKING NEW PEOPLE TO WRITE REVIEWS
Details...


Title Search:

List All Reviews
New Reviews

Join Us!
Video Store
Reviews
Daily Dose
Games
Forum
Site of the Week
Home


About this Site
Contact Us

Disclaimer

The 100




Cruising
(1980)
Reviewed by Ned Daigle
Rating: 6.5 Beans

ome movies make you feel like taking a shower after watching them. William Friedkin's "Cruising" makes you want to be blasted with a firehose and scrubbed with bleach.

In 1980, "Cruising" was greeted with unheralded controversy while it was being filmed, protest groups tried to get production stopped, and even star Al Pacino wanted out. But it was completed and released and promptly bombed sending Friedkin into a creative tailspin he has never recovered from.

Pacino stars as cop Steve Burns who is sent undercover in New York City to infiltrate the gay underworld and capture a serial killer. The opening scenes of the movie pretty much set the dreary, ugly tone. The victim picks up the killer and takes him to a local motel. After they romp, the killer ties up the man and graphically stabs him in the back in loving closeup as he screams and blood spurts out of his wounds. Nice.

Anyway, Pacino begins to make the rounds in the seedy leather clubs, randomly picking up guys he thinks may be the killer. Considering the script forgets to really give him any leads or clues it's a wonder how the investigation can possibly progress. Pacino just goes from club to club, looking embalmed (he truly looks like he wanted out of this picture in the worst way), and going home to his wife (Karen Allen) after a hard day.

While all of this is going on, the killer continues on his merry way. Eventually Pacino discovers who the killer is and solves the case. He just happens to guess the killer's identity, and even though the killer's voice is heard throughout the flick, it doesn't really jibe. No matter. "Cruising" is just an exercise in offensive ugliness. Every gay man in the movie is shown as perverted, depraved, a leather freak, a hustler or just plain weird.

Friedkin tried to divert the controversy by putting a disclaimer at the beginning of the movie, but that hardly makes any difference. Worst of all, the ending tries to convey that since Pacino has been exposed to this lifestyle so much that he now himself is a killer.

"Cruising" is full of grisly violence (various stabbings, body parts floating in the ocean etc.), bizarre sex acts (there is a scene that implies "fisting", if you don't what that is look it up), and even subplots that only exist to make everything even more depraved (two men masquerading as cops pick up a couple of drag queens and force them into sexual favors to avoid arrest "Come up here and I'll show you my nightstick").

Grim and vile in equal measures, everyone involved should hang their heads in shame. "Cruising" is the only movie that should come with a free bottle of disinfectant with every rental.






"Bad Movie Night" is a presentation of
Hit-n-Run Productions, © 1997-2006,
a subsidiary of Syphon Interactive, LLC.

Site created and managed by Ken and Scoot