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The 100




Forbidden Dance, The
(1990)
Reviewed by Angele Fauchier
Rating: 7 Beans

e all remember the lambada fad of 1990, which spawned 2 movies, a song, and thousands of clumsy people flailing their hips. The Forbidden Dance is the movie about the Brazilian princess, as opposed to Lambada, the movie about the math teacher.

The Forbidden Dance begins with a sexy dance scene, dozens of sexy Brazilian youths gyrating in their loincloths. From there, it catapults into a compelling "rainforest destruction" storyline, but fear not, the sexy dancing never stops.

To fight the giant corporation threatening their rainforest home, an Amazonian tribe sends their princess Nisa, played by Laura Herring (Miss USA 1985) to corporate headquarters in Los Angeles. Nisa is chaperoned by the tribe's witch doctor, stereotypically played by Sid Haig, who has guest starred in every TV show imaginable (The A-Team, Batman, Charlie's Angels, The Dukes of Hazzard, MacGyver, Star Trek...).

Laughed out of the building, Nisa is befriended by a stereotypical Mexican maid Carmen, played by the Cube-tastic Angela Moya (Gleaming the Cube, and the cartoon Rubik The Amazing Cube), who gets Nisa a job with a wealthy, stereotypically snobby family. Their lazy son Jason (who aside from this movie has only ever starred in hard core porn) watches Nisa rub sacred artifacts against her pelvis and lambada with the drapes in her flimsy nightgown, and you can imagine the rest: snobby friends, whorehouse, kidnapping by heartless mercenary from heartless corporation, dance contest.

There is the occasional public service message, such as the blatant use of condoms or the memorable catch phrase, "They must stop killing the trees, or the sun will eat the air!"

Linguists may enjoy watching the movie because nobody seems to realize that in Brazil they speak Portugese, not Spanish. The rest of you may enjoy watching the movie if you want to hear that Lambada song over and over and over. The millions of Kid Creole fans will enjoy his cameo. Personally, I just can't get enough of the "dance contest to save the day" genre, which I like to call the "Electric Boogaloo" genre. But beware, if you attempt to watch The Forbidden Dance, you may be ridiculed by loved ones and/or the video store clerk, who can't understand the power of the Dance.






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