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The 100




Man Who Knew Too Little, The
(1997)
Reviewed by Ken M. Wilson
Rating: 6 Beans

ill Murray is funny. He busted ghosts as Doctor Venkman in "Ghostbusters." He told a stage hand to staple antlers on a mouse in "Scrooged." He kidnapped and drove off a cliff with Puxatawnie Phil in "Groundhog's Day." For Christ's sake, he was Carl Spackler, greenskeeper extraordinaire, in "Caddyshack." Why, then, has every comedy he's undertaken dropped out of theatre's faster than Eric Clapton's son from the 49th floor? He's now about as funny as Paul Reiser... and that's not funny.

In "The Man Who Knew Too Little," Murray has managed to make it to England on a surprise visit to see his younger brother, played by slicked-up Peter "Yeah, I was on the Sandra Bullock Bandwagon" Gallagher. Lil' bro is hosting a big dinner party with high-powered banker cohorts and dishes poor Murray off to a night of the "Theatre of Life," England's version of "The Real World." Who would have thunk it, but Bill ends up bumbling into the middle of an actual real-life drama full of espionage, gun-play, and Joanne Whalley-Kilmer in a French maid's outfit. After Joanne changed her clothes, the movie was as good as over for me -- and that was fifteen minutes into the movie.

This..... film..... dragged..... on...... longer...... than..... Oprah's..... ass. Laughs were few and far in-between (the operative word being "few"). Murray's character never does find out that what he thought was all a part of the fun was in actuality dangerous reality even though Gallagher was right there to break it to him. That was the one thing I was holding out for, seeing Murray freak out at the realization. But no, the movie called for it to end with the whole "what a man, what a man, what a mighty, mighty good man" mentality. Damn!

Typically, a "Bad Movie Night" choice is supposed to do several things -- make me cringe, invigorate me, make me laugh at the fact that it's such a bad movie, and, above all, to make me feel proud that I plunked down cash money to keep the bad movie industry afloat. "The Man Who Knew Too Little" did next to none of these even though it was a horribly bad movie.

I feel for you, Bill Murray. You are a comedy legend. Hardly a day goes by without me quoting you from one of your great movies. Hang in there, guy. Don't make me continue to review your work at "Bad Movie Night." Please, though, don't put on the spook bustin' outfit again to make "Ghostbusters III" -- granted, I'd be front row, but please... for me... don't do it.


Other reviews for this movie:

Chris Bjuland
Scott Murdock




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Hit-n-Run Productions, © 1997-2006,
a subsidiary of Syphon Interactive, LLC.

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